How To Use A Compressor On Vocals?

What does a compressor do to vocals?

Compression makes the volume of a vocal more consistent overall. In fact it was originally called “Automatic Level Control.” So if you’re singing or rapping some words louder than others, compression makes for a less drastic volume difference between the loud and quiet parts.

Should I use a compressor when recording vocals?

So perhaps the best advice is to conservatively apply the best of both worlds: use a little compression while recording — just enough to help limit the most unruly peaks and phrases and to even out the recorded signal — and then add more compression to taste during mixing.

How much compression should I use on vocals?

A good starting point for a rock vocal would be a 4:1 ratio with a medium-fast attack and a medium release. Then, set the threshold for around 4 to 6dB of gain reduction. Increase or decrease the attack time until you get the right level of forwardness for the mix.

What is a good reverb setting for vocals?

Move the pre-delay to about 30-40% or so as a starting point and see how it sounds. With your EQ, maybe set the high-pass around 200Hz and the low-pass at about 12kHz. In a situation like this, you may want to have more body in the reverb.

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What is the best compressor for vocals?

The Best Vocal Compressors for Studio-Quality Audio

  • Avalon. VT-737SP. A go-to for professional pop, R&B, & rap studio recordings.
  • Warm Audio. WA76. This limiting amplifier is designed to affordably emulate the classic UA 1176, which is nearly impossible to find these days.
  • FMR Audio. Really Nice Compressor.

Should you record vocals without effects?

Vocals should always be recorded dry. Meaning that there are no time based effects such as reverb and delay on the track when you record.

What level should I record vocals?

You should record vocals at an average of -18dB for 24-bit resolution. The loudest parts of the recording should peak at -10dB and be lowest at -24dB. This is to keep an even balance on the level of the vocals without distortion.

Which comes first compression or EQ?

Each position, EQ pre (before) or EQ post (after) compression produces a distinctly different sound, a different tonal quality, and coloration. As a rule, using EQ in front of your compressor produces a warmer, rounder tone, while using EQ after your compressor produces a cleaner, clearer sound.

How do I compress vocals like a pro?

This is how to compress vocals using a lighter, more musical approach:

  1. First of all, load up a compressor.
  2. Next, lower the threshold and raise the ratio to extreme settings.
  3. Start with a medium attack time around 15ms and adjust to taste.
  4. Dial in a medium release time of 40ms and adjust from there.

How do I make my vocals louder?

Once you apply these ten techniques, your mixes as a whole will improve.

  1. Top-End Boost.
  2. Use a De’Esser.
  3. Remove Resonances.
  4. Control the Dynamics with Automation.
  5. Catch the Peaks with a Limiter.
  6. Use Multiband Compression.
  7. Enhance the Highs with Saturation.
  8. Use Delays Instead of Reverb.
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Do rappers double their vocals?

Rappers and singers have traditionally recorded vocal doubles (informally called “vocal dubs”) on the ending phrases every bar or half a bar..

What effects to add to vocals?

The options available for vocal effects are broad. They include reverb, delay, choir, distortion, compression, gain automation, de-essing, EQ, pitch shift, and echo.

Is Plate reverb best for vocals?

Plate reverb works well on many vocals for a couple of reasons. First, you usually want your vocal to cut through the mix. Plate reverb’s bright tone boosts the presence of the vocal, helping it cut through more easily. Second, the slightly unnatural sound of a plate can help the vocal feel unique.

Should you add reverb in mastering?

Generally, you’ re going to want to place your reverb on individual instruments versus the master output. Each individual sound being created in a room generates its own reverb. Typically, the louder a reverb is the further back in the soundscape an instrument sounds like it is.

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